California Museums Can Help California Schools

The California Association of Museums (CAM) joined the American Association of Museums' (AAM) Center for the Future of Museums to organize a 30th anniversary celebration aimed at forecasting the future of California's museums, and published a discussion guide entitled "Tomorrow in the Golden State: Museums...

Kids Are Wired Differently

In a book to be released later this month (August 18) called Now You See It: How the Brain Science of Attention Will Transform the Way We Live, Work, and Learn, former Provost at Duke University and founder of the Humanities, Arts, Science, and Technology...

Opera Ups Its Presence in Schools

According to the Washington Post citing a recent study by the National Endowment for the Arts, "The audience for the performing arts is slipping nationwide. But opera has proved to do slightly better than other classical forms -- orchestral music or ballet -- in terms...

Arts For All

Given California's budget woes, it is amazing that this program, starting as early as it did, survived. Americans for the Arts, the nation's leading arts advocacy organization, recently awarded the Arts Education Award to Arts for All June 16 at their annual convention, held in...

What Science Can Learn from the Arts

Scientists should engage with designers for utilitarian reasons, to communicate with the public because they understand the natural world through metaphor. He basically advocates sci-fi as a way of expanding the mind. Things are complex and they cost a lot of investigate. 11 dimensions can't...

Americans for the Arts Talks Creativity

Increasingly, many states are talking about our "jobless recovery" and the vital role the arts can play in preparing the 21st century workforce. Indeed, the California Alliance for Arts Education and The California Arts Council are in agreement: "creativity and innovation...

Arts graduates find jobs, satisfaction

by Dan Berrett, Inside Higher Education

Conventional wisdom has long held that pursuing a career in the arts is a likely ticket to a life of perennial unhappiness, hunger and unemployment. But the opposite appears to be true — graduates of arts programs are likely to find jobs and satisfaction, even if they won’t necessarily get wealthy in the process — according to a new national survey of more than 13,000 alumni of 154 different arts programs.

“Arts graduates are finding ways to put together careers and be employed — and many of them are satisfied with their work,” said Steven J. Tepper, associate director of the Curb Center for Art, Enterprise and Public Policy, assistant professor in the department of sociology at Vanderbilt University and senior scholar of the Strategic National Arts Alumni Project (SNAAP).The results of the survey, which are being released today, may offer some measure of succor to parents who are anxious about their children’s artistic aspirations. And, while the survey may help arts programs defend against accusations that they produce an oversupply of soon-to-be-discouraged artists, they also suggest areas — particularly in the area of career preparation — in which these programs can improve.

The results reflect the responses of 13,581 alumni of 154 arts colleges and conservatories; arts schools and departments within broader colleges and universities; and arts high schools. They constitute the largest dataset gathered about the lives and careers of arts graduates, according to George Kuh, professor emeritus at Indiana and SNAAP project director (SNAAP is based at the Indiana University Center for Postsecondary Research at the School of Education). Those surveyed include graduates from fine arts, theater, dance, music, creative writing, media arts, film, design and architecture programs between 2005 and 2009, as well as those who graduated in 2000, 1995 and 1990.