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The Art of Science Learning: Shaping the 21st-Century Workforce

June 14-15 San Diego: CALIT2
California Institute of Telecommunications and Information Technology (CALIT2) at the University of California San Diego, in collaboration with the San Diego Science Alliance

Details San DIego 
lemelsonMSI 

The Art of Science Learning, a project of The Learning Worlds Institute, explores ways in which the arts can help improve how people of all ages learn the sciences. Hands-on, imaginative approaches to science education, using many of the methods used in the creative arts, have been shown to attract and retain young people in the fields of Science, Technology, Engineering and Mathematics (sometimes known as the STEM disciplines).

Responding to concerns that the U.S. risks lagging behind other nations (See “Bridging the Innovation Gap”) in both the scientific literacy and the innovative capacity of its workforce, the Art of Science Learning is convening scientists, artists, educators, business leaders, researchers and policymakers in three conferences in Spring 2011 to explore how the arts can be engaged to strengthen STEM skills and spark creativity in the 21st-Century American workforce.

The Conferences are hands-on, workshop-oriented events that will showcase interdisciplinary methods and techniques used by educators and artists, share the results of current research into the impact of arts-based approaches to science education, and explore the connection between the arts and American economic competitiveness. 

Rep. Duncan Hunter Introduces First Education Reform Bill

Rep. Duncan Hunter (R-CA), chairman of the Subcommittee on Early Childhood, Elementary, and Secondary Education, today introduced the first in a series of education reform bills planned by the House Education and the Workforce Committee. Rep. Hunter’s legislation, the Setting New Priorities in Education Spending...

URGENT – Act Now to Support Arts Education!

The Arts in Education (AIE) program at the U.S. Department of Education is the ONLY source of dedicated federal education funding to support arts education, a core academic subject of learning proven to improve schools, teaching, and student success in school, work, and life....

Blame It All on Globalization 3.0

John M. EgerHuffington Post

Lionel Van Deerlin Professor of Communications and Public Policy, San Diego State University

Posted: Posted: 05/23/11

The challenge America faces in the wake of global competition is daunting.

We have lost our prowess in manufacturing, and in the provision of services like banking, accounting and insurance because computers can be found almost everywhere in the world, and any country can provide such services at a fraction of the cost, and ship it via telecommunications.

Globalization 3.0, first coined by The New York Times columnist Thomas Friedman, is here. Yes, as Friedman says, The World is Flat. Outsourcing and offshoring have entered our lexicon of new words. We are currently suffering what economists are euphemistically calling a “jobless recovery,” and our communities and schools are facing challenges not well understood by politicians, policy makers or parents.

We don’t know exactly how many jobs are lost from offshoring. But this shift of high tech service jobs will be a permanent feature of economic life in the 21st century.

While CEOs, economists and politicians are telling us that these are short-term adjustments, it is clear that the pervasive worldwide spread of the Internet, digitization and the availability of white collar skills abroad — where the labor cost alone may justify the move — mean huge cost savings for those global corporations.

STEAM Learning Network – Education reform in Florida is working

The STEAM Learning Network seeks to explore, refine and widely distribute methods for infusing arts-based techniques into the learning and retention of Science, Technology, Engineering and Mathematics (STEM) concepts across America. By incorporating successful practices from the performing and digital arts into the K-12...

San Diego Youth Symphony Community Opus Project Concert – May 2011

The value of the Arts is measured in so many dimensions. The San Diego Youth Symphony Community Opus Project concert held at Castle Park Middle School provided inspiration to community members, family, and the students. The students engagement, decrease in drop-out rates, increase in better...

Math is the poetry of the mind

by erinvrAdd a comment

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What, after all, is mathematics but the poetry of the mind, and what is poetry but the mathematics of the heart?
–American mathematician David Eugene Smith

If at first glance poetry and math seem as far apart as data and doughnuts, a closer look reveals a strong connection. Especially in more traditional poetry, mathematical concepts influence the structure of a poem: its shape, the lengths of its lines and stanzas, and its patterns of rhythm and rhyme.

What would a Shakespearean sonnet be, for example, without its rhyme scheme (a-b-a-b, c-d-c-d, e-f-e-f, g-g) and its use of iambic pentameter? (An iamb is a unit of two syllables, with the accent on the second syllable; the pentameter tells you there are five of those units per line.)

Iambic Pentameter

Even people who profess to know nothing about poetry will recognize the strict rhythm and rhyme scheme (a-a-b-b-a) of the most memorable and maligned of all poetic forms, the limerick.

Left Brain/Right Brain – Pathways to Reach Every Learner

By Diane Connell

By better understanding our own neurological strengths and weaknesses, we can adapt our lessons to reach all of our students.

Sam, a fourth grade student, starts to draw every time I teach a new concept or explain an assignment. We’ve been in school for only two weeks why is he tuning me out already? Dorothy says that she feels ill every time I begin an art lesson, and asks to go see the nurse. Why doesn’t she enjoy art as much as the other children do?

Wouldn’t it be wonderful to start the year with a single plan that would ensure that we could reach all of our students? As we know, such a plan does not exist. The students we teach have diverse learning styles that require different approaches. So how can we adapt our teaching to reach and engage as many of them as possible, as often as possible?

Interestingly, the answer lies in first knowing ourselves as teachers. One way to do this is to understand how our own “neurological style” influences the way we teach. Each one of us has a left-, a right-, or a middle-brain preference, and believe it or not this significantly influences our teaching patterns. By understanding the processes at work in the brain, we can better help our students to explore their own individual preferences.

This quiz will help you learn whether you are a left-, right-, or middle-brain teacher. Please take a few minutes to complete the quiz and tally the results.

Science, art combine to reproduce paintings from the past

Using laser and nanotechnology, scientists in Chicago have been able to go back in time and uncover how masterpieces from artists like Homer and Van Gogh might have looked like when they were first painted. Ben Gruber reports. ...