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[+a]rts Education

As an art student, I understand the importance of having an artistically enriched education. This short public service announcement that I wrote, directed, edited, and filmed is the product for my Graduation Project....

Pfizer’s La Jolla image contest illuminates intersection of science, art

Cool Region ’09 ‘Arts meets science

In 2007 Cityregion Arnhem Nijmegen wanted to put themselfs on the map national and international as a ‘Cool Region’. To bring that message we made a strong telling movie. Now in 2009 the Cool Region made the statement and wanted to make a more visual...

Through The [+a]rts

A documentary showing how teachers at one Orlando elementary school have improved the education of their students in all areas by including the arts in their everyday instruction and in their core curriculum. Math, science, and english....

STEM to STEAM Animation

This is an animation short i made for a STEM (Science/Technology/Engineering/Math) to STEAM (A=Art) conference that happened here at the Rhode Island School of Design this past week, which focused on finding new ways for arts and sciences to collaborate and co-inhabit one another in...

Creative Learning Programs for Middle and High School Students

Vector Art & Product Design: At FAB LAB @ UCSD Extension, students learn how to design shapes in 2D in order to translate their designs into 3-dimensional objects, using a vector editing software such as Adobe Illustrator to create products that they cut using a...

ROTC Plus – The Value of Liberal Arts Education

 March 29, 2011    A graduate of Dickinson College serving as an infantry platoon recently leader praised — of all things — his liberal arts education for helping his unit make military gains in the Kandahar province of Afghanistan.

One day, as he recounted in an e-mail that he sent to Dickinson President William G. Durden, the graduate, who was commissioned through Dickinson’s Reserve Officers Training Corps and majored in Middle Eastern history, found himself sharing small talk with five village elders. After he recited the first chapter of the Koran (which he learned as part of a class assignment), the first lieutenant earned the men’s trust, he wrote to Durden.

Soon after, one of the men handed over five small papers which appeared to be “night letters,” or notes left by the Taliban on local mosques or the doors of homes. Typically, such letters urge resistance or threaten violence to those who cooperate with American forces. These, however, were asking for help. “The three letters this man gave to me thus signaled a major shift in Taliban morale in our area of operations, and at the end of the day became very valuable intelligence information,” the unnamed lieutenant wrote.

This episode — which demonstrates how core liberal arts subjects, such as foreign language, cultural studies and history can yield better-trained, more culturally sophisticated soldiers and officers — illustrates the kind of thing that Dickinson’s administration and military analysts want to see happening more often. And, by ensuring that future military leaders learn on campus alongside more typical students, higher education and military officials hope to start bridging the divide that separates servicemen and -women from the rest of society.

On Monday, the college announced that Dickinson had received $100,000 from the Andrew W. Mellon Foundation to organize forums (one next month and another in the fall) that will help liberal arts colleges collaborate with neighboring military institutions of higher education. The forums will draw upon and look to strengthen several existing relationships between neighboring institutions: Dickinson and the nearby U.S. Army War College; Bard, Union and Vassar colleges and the U.S. Military Academy at West Point; St. John’s College and the U.S. Naval Academy in Annapolis, Md.; and Colorado College and the U.S. Air Force Academy.

Pushing Creativity – ProfHacker – The Chronicle of Higher Education

Creativity is fine and good, but what happens when that creativity you think you need isn’t available to you? It’s blocked. It’s dormant. It just disappeared. My suggestion? Push it. And push it intentionally. This intentionality can push you out of stasis and into action....