Merging Art and Business in the College Curriculum

John M. Eger Become a fanDirector of the Creative Economy Initiative at San Diego State University (SDSU) is also the Van Deerlin Endowed Chair of Communications and Public Policy Clearly something is happening in universities across the country. This week San Diego State University is launching a Music...

Brave New World: Who Muzzled All the Artists?

Have you ever gone to an art museum and wondered what a particular piece of art meant? I have. I mean, why wouldn't you? It's a picture, or a statue, or some other object that apparently meant enough to someone at some time that they...

California Museums Can Help California Schools

The California Association of Museums (CAM) joined the American Association of Museums' (AAM) Center for the Future of Museums to organize a 30th anniversary celebration aimed at forecasting the future of California's museums, and published a discussion guide entitled "Tomorrow in the Golden State: Museums...

Mayors With a New Vision of Creativity and Innovation Wanted

John M. Eger – Huffington Post

Lionel Van Deerlin Professor of Communications and Public Policy, San Diego State University

Posted: 08/16/11

 

Almost 20 years ago, when San Diego Mayor Susan Golding was just elected, she had the foresight to launch a “city of the future” committee. San Diego really didn’t know what a city of the future looked like, but knew then you had to have fiber optics — lots of bandwidth in the ground. So it was fiber optics and bandwidth that was on everybody’s lips.

Today, understanding the challenges of the new global economy and knowing what it takes to succeed in the workplace of the future, we know it is not bandwidth in the ground that is so important as the bandwidth in people’s heads.

Within the next several months there are countless mayoral races that present an opportunity to talk about a new path for the future of cities.

It is the worst of times to have such a conversation, many would say, with pension deficits looming, services being cut and unemployment at an all time high. Yet, as the Cheshire cat said to Alice in Alice in Wonderland, “if you don’t know where you are going any road will get you there.”

It is time Americans know the road they must take. It’s also time we talk candidly about the connections between art, commerce, education and economic development and importantly, what communities everywhere must do to be successful in what is being called “the creative and innovative economy.”

Many cities are struggling to redefine themselves or reinvent a strategy to jumpstart economic development, and to figure out what is happening to our economy. We know it’s global, and as Thomas Friedman of the New York Times has told us, it’s “flat.” We know, too, it’s digital and that growth of the Internet and the World Wide Web is compelling development of a global economy. But it is creativity — simply defined as “the quality or ability to create or invent something original” — that best defines the characteristic most of us need to succeed in the new economy.

Opera Ups Its Presence in Schools

According to the Washington Post citing a recent study by the National Endowment for the Arts, "The audience for the performing arts is slipping nationwide. But opera has proved to do slightly better than other classical forms -- orchestral music or ballet -- in terms...

Arts For All

Given California's budget woes, it is amazing that this program, starting as early as it did, survived. Americans for the Arts, the nation's leading arts advocacy organization, recently awarded the Arts Education Award to Arts for All June 16 at their annual convention, held in...

Closing the Digital Divide

John M. Eger – Huffington Post

Lionel Van Deerlin Professor of Communications and Public Policy, San Diego State University

Posted: Posted: 06/7/11

As globalization spreads, it is imperative that we not only close the “digital divide” in hardware and infrastructure, but also use technology to dramatically confront the world illiteracy problem in developing nations today.

In many parts of the world, a system of education either does not exist or girls, for example, are not privileged to get an education. Cyber education may be the only alternative to providing the basic skills for economic survival.

UNESCO’s Institute for Statistics provides a rough estimate of the world budget for education in the world, and comes up with the figure of about two trillion dollars. This of course, does not include money spent for tutoring, private schools, museum visits and the like.

But every child needs basic math and science and language skills, at least the three R’s and then some. So like payroll software, which every enterprise needs, why can’t we provide these forms of instruction through Cyber-Schools? Why can’t we develop the best, brightest and most practical methods of learning and make them widely available using the technology we have before us?

The Economist magazine recently teamed with Innocentive, an award granting corporation, as it advertises itself, connecting ” seekers with solvers” to enable other corporations the “shortest, most cost-effective path to finding a solution. “

National Science Foundation Slowly Turning STEM to STEAM

John M. EgerHuffington Post

Lionel Van Deerlin Professor of Communications and Public Policy, San Diego State University

Posted: Posted: 05/31/11

The STEM Initiative more and more looks like its morphing into STEAM.

Thanks to the National Science Foundation (NSF) and the tireless effort and vision of Harvey Seifter, CEO of Seifter Associates and a principal of Learning Worlds, three conference were scheduled this year — in Washington, D.C., Chicago, Illinois and San Diego, California — to look at what business, education, and communities across the U.S. were doing to merge the “two cultures” of art and science.

In the process, Harvey Seifter with support of the NSF is putting the arts into the STEM formula (Science, Technology, Engineering and Math) and more precisely, exploring a framework for sparking creativity and innovation in our schools, our workplaces, and in our nation.

Two of the conferences have already been held:

• April 6-7: Washington, D.C., at the Smithsonian’s National Museum of American History.

• May 16-17: Chicago, at the Illinois Institute of Technology.

The San Diego Conference scheduled June 14-15 at the California Institute of Telecommunications and Information Technology at the University of California, San Diego held in collaboration with the San Diego Science Alliance remains.

In a sense, the San Diego event is a culmination of the larger effort to forge an agenda for more in-depth research leading to action that in a matter of years will change education in America.

The data points for moving STEM to STEAM are becoming clearer, and the urgency of revisiting the current pedagogy used in pre-schools, K-12, and our universities, obvious.

Art and Physics at the Lux

Lux sees its mission, primarily, to "support artists in the development of new projects through a residency program, and share their discoveries with scholars, art patrons and a regional and national audience," and to "educate and engage the community to foster an appreciation of the...